EQUIPMENT

Harrington_CombatAll Harringtons’ should aim to bring the following personal equipment to an event.

FOR THE LIVING HISTORY ENCAMPMENT (LHE)

  • Trencher/Bowl, Knife, spoon, Cup. Pricker optional.
  • Stool / Chair / Box to sit upon.
  • Pavaise
  • Defensive stake.

 

The Companye uses the following equipment guidance:

 

CLOTHING

MEN:

  • Boots
  • hose (preferably joined),
  • Shirt
  • Braies
  • Doublet
  • Livery Coat or Jacket
  • Belt
  • Hat
  • Pouch/Bag
  • Water container

WOMEN:

  • Shoes
  • Shift
  • Kirtle
  • Gown or Cloak (Optional). Note hood should be separate to the cloak. Pouch/Bag
  • Water container.

In terms of the colours available, please stick to natural dyes. The following image shows what is possible using natural dyes (courtesy of Susan Sümer)

colour references

See also the excellent guide to colours written by Gwen of Historic Enterprises.

ARMOUR & ARMAMENTS

Each Harrington should determine which role within the Lance they are aiming to portray and work towards the equipment listed. The ordannaces from Burgundy are repeated below. The Burgundian term is referenced in italics following a roughly equivalent English term. Also note that although the Burgundian ordannces refer to Cavalry, the English much preferred to fight on foot at this period, so you don’t have to bring a horse along to an event (unless you want to!)

Knight (Chef d’chambre)
image

Full harness, war horse with chanfrain and war saddle. Lance or polaxe if fighting on foot, bastard sword, mace or war hammer, dagger.
Shoes, hoes, shirt, doublet, belt, hat and jacket. These should all be of best quality materials

Heavy Cavalry (Hommes d’armes)

20130813-013647.jpg
The hommes d’armes were heavy cavalry. In Burgundy they were primarily still deployed on horse, but the English preferred the tactic of fighting dismounted.

Full harness, war horse with chanfrain and war saddle. Lance or polaxe if fighting on foot, bastard sword, mace or war hammer, dagger.
Shoes, hoes, shirt, doublet, belt, hat and jacket. These should all be of better quality materials than the basic clothes

Squire (Valet)
The main function of the valet was to support the hommes d’armes and coustiliers, not all valets seem to have had armour. Sallet, bevor or maille standard, brigandine and maille shirt or back and breast and plate arm harness, gauntlets, leg harness Light lance or guisarme (bill) if fighting on foot, bastard sword, dagger. Shoes, hoes, shirt, doublet, belt, hat and jacket. These should all be of better quality materials than the basic

Heavy Infantry (Coustilier)

This retained Coustilier is a veteran of the Companye. He has been rewarded for his service, and is expensively equipped by his Lord. He wears a brigandine, a garment of linked plates allowing great flexibility and protection, and is carrying his helmet - an Barbute of italian design, imported from Milan.

This retained Coustilier is a veteran of the Companye. He has been rewarded for his service, and is expensively equipped by his Lord. He wears a brigandine, a garment of linked plates allowing great flexibility and protection, and is carrying his helmet – an Barbute of italian design, imported from Milan.

Deployed as light cavalry, although they were sometimes used to increase the ranks of the hommes d’armes, or as heavy infantry assigned to defend the archers. Sallet, bevor or maille standard, brigandine and maille shirt or cuirass, plate arm harness, gauntlets, plate leg harness. Light lance or guisarme (bill or glaive) if fighting on foot, bastard sword, dagger.

Archers

Harrington Archers

Sallet (with or without visor), maille standard, brigandine, padded jack (mounted archers should also have; thigh boots, horse and saddle). Bow and quiver, lead hammer, bastard sword, dagger

Arbalest (Crossbowmen)
Sallet, bevor or maille standard, brigandine over padded jack, leg harness. Crossbow and quiver, bastard sword, dagger.

Handgunners
Handgunners

Sallet and bevor, breast plate over sleeved maille shirt.
Handgun, falchion, buckler, dagger

Billman (Pikemen)

Retained Pikeman of the Companye. He wears a late 15thC variant of the ubiquitous Kettle helm.  His body is well protected by a maille shirt, with his stomach region additionally reinforced with a plackart - no one wanted to die slowly and painfully of a gut wound! He carries the fearsome 'langue de bouef' or 'ox tongue' - a viscous 7ft polearm capable of both cutting and thrusting at speed, a fact which his opponent  has found  at the cost of their life...

Retained Pikeman of the Companye. He wears a late 15thC variant of the ubiquitous Kettle helm. His body is well protected by a maille shirt, with his stomach region additionally reinforced with a plackart – no one wanted to die slowly and painfully of a gut wound! He carries the fearsome ‘langue de bouef’ or ‘ox tongue’ – a viscous 7ft polearm capable of both cutting and thrusting at speed, a fact which his opponent has found at the cost of their life…

Sallet, breast plate over padded jack. Spear, arming sword, buckler, dagger

General Note: Our medieval ancestors were less fussy about categorisation than their Victorian descendents. A lot of out terminology for types of armour comes from the latter. Therefore when it references ‘sallet’ above, it can be better thought of as ‘helmet’.

Harrington Banner

Advertisements
  1. Event Review -Sandwich Medieval Festival | Sir William Harrington's Companye

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: